Corny Point

On the ‘toe’ of Yorke Peninsula, South Australia, lies the small town of Corny Point. It was named by Matthew Flinders, who thought it resembled a growth on the toe of the peninsula, which is shaped, like Italy, in a boot.

Corny Point is a popular destination for surfers – body and board, and for many people it is beyond phone range, making it the ideal getaway.

 

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the steep stairs to Berry Bay
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Body boarders in medium swell

The caravan park is accessible in terms of transport and price and there is a range of accommodation options, good facilities for all the family and excellent advice on surfing, fishing and touring. If the cockies wake you in the morning you can catch a lovely sunrise through the sheoaks and gums.

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The nearby beaches of Berry Bay are the best in the area for body boarding and board surfers aren’t usually disappointed. It is usual to see between three and five dolphins cresting the water and coming in quite close to catch their share of the waves. Nearby coastal access also provides anglers with plenty of salmon and other fish, although without a boat I haven’t, personally, had much luck.

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Berry Bay from South Berry to the lighthouse.

The area near the lighthouse has a lovely sheltered bay, suitable for individuals and families, to explore, swim or fish. The way down is a little steep, but a well-worn path exists and we go there every year, to be delighted each time by the colours and limestone formations.

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The 15m high lighthouse was occupied and lit in 1882 and became automated in 1920. It provides important navigational aid to the coastline.

Corny Point was established in 1881, in response to the lighthouse being built, with the first settler being in the area 40 years earlier. It is an agricultural area, with mostly barley, lentils and chick peas grown there, now. In its early days, the successful dairy produced milk for the whole peninsula and it was carried by dray to Moonta, about 150 km away. In the heat of Summer, the condition of the milk upon arrival was not always great and it was not uncommon for people to try and waylay the load before journey’s end.

No dairy exists today and there is a tennis club, cricket, surf school, general store, church shared by three denominations and a pub. Nearby towns such as Warooka and Point Turton provide easy destinations for food and sight-seeing, but you can’t go past Innes National Park, Gleeson’s Landing and Pondalowie Bay for dramatic coastline, good surf for the experienced and endless fishing and camping.

While good highways and roadways get you to the main towns, there are plenty of dirt roads, some corrugated, and little development – this is a true escape.

Take a hat, sunscreen and water. Pack your board, or hire it from Neptune’s Surf School.

Safe Travels.

Somnalent Stansbury

In Australia, the Summer holiday season is approaching. Amidst the excitement and bustle of Christmas and the emotion of the school year ending, a corner of our minds steals away to plan an escape.

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This week’s photo challenge, Serene, has taken a lot of people to the water. Australians appreciate that – we are a big island where most people hug the coast. Personally, when I lose my inner calm I head to the beach and watch the water lap at the edges of the sand. Refreshing and dangerous. Ever-changing. Timeless.

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On the Yorke Peninsula of South Australia lies Stansbury, a town of less than 1000 people with excellent seafood, delightful streets and views, and a great caravan park where you can get a site right on the shoreline (as the photos taken at dawn, above, show). Only an hour from Adelaide, it is excellent for kayaking, fishing, crabbing, swimming or just being silent. As with a lot of this Peninsula, the water can be quite shallow for a long while, but it does make it very safe for small children, and families love it.

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The town has all the facilities you need and is part of the Walk the Yorke project, where it is planned to have 500 km of walking trail along the coastline. We took our bikes and ended up in some interesting places, on some death-defying goat tracks and eventually a beach. Still here, though! There are good places to explore the shoreline and the limestone cliffs.

Whatever is going on in my life, the tide will rise and fall, regardless, connecting every continent and every person, with all of our joys and cares. Today, tomorrow and always. And this moment will be forgotten, is small by comparison. Very little really matters in the big scheme of things. .

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Tomorrow will bring another adventure.

Safe travels. Always take water and a hat.