Waterwords

When I saw the theme for this week’s photo challenge, I delved straight into my Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) folder, as the Tasmanian gallery is filled with the unusual.

My final choice involved the piece that had an art ignoramus like me transfixed for the longest time. The backdrop is a high wall of what appears to be stone, with two side panels of the same material, creating a 3D frame. This transverses two levels and from a metal beam at the top, where lights are strategically placed, water shoots out at regular intervals, creating different words, that once formed, plunge to oblivion.

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So, in order to take the picture, I had to practice a bit so that I could actually get the word and try to catch the effect. As you see, I finally shot ‘shooting’, which I thought was even more unusual.

The words seem to be unrelated to anything, but maybe if I spent the day there…And what do I call this – a water feature? water words? water wall? waterfall? word fall?

To get the full scale, I put another shot here ( I think the word is smash):

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Look, even if you are not into art, like me, you have to visit this place. So many extraordinary visions will stay with me forever. Tasmania is a picturesque place in itself – see one of my blogs on the Island.

Safe travels. Take a camera, but turn the flash off.

 

Hobart

Our real discovery of Hobart began with a cool sunrise! But we had arrived there the afternoon before.

Mona – the museum of old and new art- was first on the Hobart agenda and despite the fact that I am not very interested in art (I visited as a result of ‘top ten things to do’ and my husband’s interest) we stayed there for about 2 hours. There are some amazing and thought provoking displays, as well as the quirky and the just plain boring.

With about an hour of daylight left, we set our sights on Mt Wellington. It is a long and winding road, narrow and steep. There are painted markers on the road, telling you how far you have to travel to the summit, but at about 5km the cloud set in. By the time we got to the top, brief slits of red sunset managed to appear on occasion, but the swirling mass of sunset-tipped cumulus nimbus obliterated the view of Hobart we hoped to get that day.

The next day we headed out to Mount Nelson, reported to have views that were sometimes better than Wellington, as they were more reliable. The stories of the keepers of the signal station, from 1811 to 1969, where they used Semaphore over great distances, were inspiring and moving. The views were quite lovely but trees had clearly grown to obscure some angles.

We didn’t really give ourselves enough time in Hobart and feel we missed the architecture of the town and the character of the wharf, along with historical and general sites like the Botanical Gardens. OK, the Cadbury chocolate factory, too.

The roads and suburbs are easy to navigate, whether you are walking or driving. We had great weather while there – around 23C each day and there were nearby places that I would visit if I went again, such as Richmond. The townships are enticing in their history and manageable size. Top Ten Tips should add ‘one or two days to explore one of those quaint towns you passed through/by.’

On our exit, we stopped to say farewell to Mt Wellington and the Tasman Bridge.

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Safe Travels. Drive slowly in fog.