Emma Gorge

On the notorious Gibb River Road, near the Kununurra end, is a place called El Questro. It is a resort and was once only accessible by a rough dirt track, that is now a bitumen road. However, places that lead off from here are via dirt roads, that may be corrugated if the grader hasn’t been through. Emma Gorge is one such place and it is a jewel worth risking the bumpy 2km track.

Once at the carpark, there is a magnificent information bay, with restaurant, accommodation, toilets and permits to visit the park. We had bought a park pass, that gives us access to WA parks for a month, as we thought it could be more convenient than having correct change, getting permits printed, etc., so we went directly to the start.

This was a mixture of terrain, with rocky bits, smooth path, climbing sections and a couple of creek crossings, where the water as very low. Birds and butterflies flit across your path and the sound of gurgling water comes from somewhere near, either seen as a brook, or hidden by reeds.

It is such a beautiful sight that greets you after about 40 minutes, I don’t know where to begin. The gorge rises ahead of you and up maybe 100m. The walls are orange and laced with ferns or marked with patterns of erosion.

Water cascades down from a point on the left and bounces off rock ledges to splash into the centre pool of water. The pool is maybe 40m in diameter and on the right a rock ledge hangs over the water, dripping onto those who venture there, and the water there is warm, as I think it is thermal.

The edges to the pool are sandy and you can see the bottom, which becomes rocky and pebbly. Towards the centre it is very dark and you cannot make out what is down there. The temperature is pretty cool, but not quite cold. As you float towards the rock lip, looking up, you see an oval of blue sky, lined with a garland of ferns and rocks. It is so tranquil and beautiful.

This is a long way from anywhere, any time. It is ancient and unspoilt and majestic, like everything in the Kimberley. See it, breathe it, feel it and carry some of its magic away with you.

But take water, hat and sunscreen so that you live to tell the tale.

The Grotto

We found this by accident, returning to Kununurra from Wyndham, at the edge of the Kimberley in Western Australia. Seeing the small sign and hoping for a minor miracle or transportation to another time, we arrived at an unremarkable park in the middle of the arid lansdcape. A gorge led off to the left and a series of narrow, steep steps descended to the right. We stood at the top of the stairway, seeing no railings, and considered our options under a very hot Australian sun.

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Suddenly, voices preceded the arrival of two adults and two small children. They encouraged us to go down, pointing out that it was isolated and had a wonderful waterhole, so we could skinny dip if we wanted. Well, I wasn’t so sure about the latter, but if two small children could manage the stairs, I could. I’m so glad I did.

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It was like something out of an Indiana Jones movie and wasn’t the first slimy pool we’d been tempted to slip into, given high temperatures and an idyllic location.  A couple of ‘Tarzan ropes’ (suspended ropes for swinging and dropping) are placed for ease of entry if you are faint-hearted. While we air-dried, we spied tiny honey eater birds, flowers and the signs of a hidden water source.

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Now, an event took place, here, that serves as a reminder when travelling. As we reached the top of the ravine once more, we were met by a man, standing at the top. He asked if we had had a good time. Harmless question. But there was something about his demeanor…

We answered that it was worth the descent and hurried to our car, taking off as quickly and naturally as we could. Had either of us been alone, or the man not have had innocent intentions…It can happen and any traveller would be wise to pause before heading into an isolated area, no matter how hot you are, or how glorious the view.

If you venture here, I have since learned that the height is 120 m and that after the wet season, a waterfall will drop behind the ropes in the pictures, above, gushing majestically over the rocks. It is a well-known swimming hole and picnic spot in the area.

Tell me if there’s something you want to know about this area or somewhere else in Australia.

Safe travels! Hat, water and a sensible sense of adventure.