Blog

Kinda erosion

Rounded boulders are common at Karlu Karlu

North of Alice Springs and South of Tennant Creek is Karlu Karlu, which means round boulders in the language of the first nation’s people of the area. They’re my entry to Becky’s squares.

Once anglicized as Devil’s marbles, most people are changing to the traditional name.

Despite their appearance of having been dropped or hurled there, the boulders have been formed by wind, heat and water erosion over millions of years.

It is believed that a large granite mass, of which they are a part, was formed by volcanic activity, 1700 million years ago. Fissures in the mass allowed the erosion and the rounding of the blocks occurred.

Stunning at sunrise and sunset, I’ve tried to select photos that are not culturally sensitive to the Arrernte people. If you come this way, do stay overnight for a small fee (it was $3.30pp) and do walks, enjoy the vibe, learn some stuff.

kinda old

These two bull kauris are found on the Lake Barrine circuit in the Atherton Tablelands of Queensland.

Estimated to be around 1000 years old, these trees provide valuable information about evolution, as their ancestors came from about 250 – 60 million years ago. Although they are on every continent except Antarctica, they have very specific requirements, surviving in altitudes between 600 and 1000 m with high rainfall and deep loam and clay soils. In Australia, they restricts them to a small region.

Worthy of Becky’s ‘kinda’ squares.

kinda leggy

The stone curlew is a pretty, timid-looking thing and the male only grows to about 60cm high. This mother and 6 week-old baby demonstrate the leggy attribute in my heading.

At night, the curlew makes a screeching sound, similar to a child or woman in great distress. They hunt in groups and the whole lot of them can wake you with their screeches.

For more ‘kinda’ photos, see here.