Parade of Light

An annual event, the Adelaide Fringe Festival, the second largest Fringe in the world after Edinburgh, has many draw cards. Not the least, for the local crowd, is the Parade of Light. There were the usual wondrous colours and displays, but a new entry in the visual splendour called to mind today’s Daily Post One Word challenge – Above.


A thick smog of odourless and moistureless smoke hung over us as laser lights were shot through it.  Never surrounding us, but ever floating over and moving like some ionised cloud. Utterly spellbinding. I hope you can get a sense of it, here:


And what of the usual sights? I’ll try to couple the buildings by day with their light show doubles. These stately buildings are some of our oldest – being a fairly young country in terms of European occupation.

State Library

The Art Gallery of South Australia

Bonython Hall, University of Adelaide

Mitchell Building,  University of Adelaide

Elder Conservatorium


And the random buildings on North Terrace, in the heart of Adelaide, the outdoor eating areas, a full moon and the alleyways as Adelaide comes alive for the Fringe.

We ate at Parwana, Afghani food. Deliciously fresh. Great, friendly service. Ebenezer Place.

Travel Safely to Adelaide during February and March, for our festival season. You’ll need plenty of water, although other refreshment can certainly be found.

Beehive yourself

While walking with one of my friends along our regular path, in the north east of Adelaide, I was going slowly, uncharacteristically, trying to see the world from another angle. When I spied…


… the most extraordinary beehive growing in a gum tree. So we approached closer and I took lots of shots. It was a sure shot for this week’s photo challenge – out of this world.


Safe travels and treks.


Creature from the deep

For this week’s photo challenge, faces in the crowd, I’ve chosen this moment, where unsuspecting beach goers saw a grounded stingray.

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Stingrays of this size or smaller do not usually go near the suburban beaches. They are very common near Elliston, on the Eyre Peninsula and I have had to step around a few small ones at Corny Point, but the crowd attention confirms their status.

I had brought relatives from Poland to Grange Beach, this day, and had to explain all the way home that it really was uncommon. The classically lay-back reaction of Australians did nothing to help my cause.

Using  a ‘vanilla’ filter creates a news event, I believe.

Safe swimming.